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If you grew up reading R.L. Stine’s Goosebumps and Fear Street YA horror novels, the thought of one of the author’s career defining series finally being made into a movie probably seems like a strange proposition. It’s not that the books are bad or unadaptable (quite the contrary), but instead are simply old; an anthology that has been continued long enough that the stories have become multi-generational. Goosebumps has already been turned into a Canadian TV series (which ran from 1995 to 1998) and Tim Burton first attempted to get a film adaptation off the ground fifteen years ago.

So here we are, with a Goosebumps movie arriving in theaters on October 16, only to find that it stars Jack Black as R.L. Stine. Yes, that Jack Black. Below is your first look at this monster cash grab with the Goosebumps trailer and poster. 

Directed by Rob Letterman, the big screen adaptation of R.L. Stine‘s classic YA books stars Jack Black, Amy Ryan, Ken Marino, Dylan Minnette, Odeya Rush, Jillian Bell and Ryan Lee.

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Here’s the plot description:

Upset about moving from a big city to a small town, teenager Zach Cooper (Dylan Minnette) finds a silver lining when he meets the beautiful girl, Hannah (Odeya Rush), living right next door. But every silver lining has a cloud, and Zach’s comes when he learns that Hannah has a mysterious dad who is revealed to be R. L. Stine (Jack Black), the author of the bestselling “Goosebumps” series. It turns out that there is a reason why Stine is so strange… he is a prisoner of his own imagination – the monsters that his books made famous are real, and Stine protects his readers by keeping them locked up in their books. When Zach unintentionally unleashes the monsters from their manuscripts and they begin to terrorize the town, it’s suddenly up to Stine, Zach, and Hannah to get all of them back in the books where they belong.

Where most nerd-boys get themselves worked up into a fever over Paul Feig messing with their precious Ghostbuster I choose to fret over a long-gestating YA adaptation of silly horror novels aimed at children.Particularly when its basis of creeps and shrieks is replaced with slapstick silliness. We all have our defects, it seems.

 

Category: Film

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