banner

jj-abrams-lawrence-kasdan-star-wars

J.J. Abrams has a lot of people excited about his next movie, a small independent feature called Star Wars: The Force Awakens. (It’s gonna be huge, I promise!) You may well remember Abrams’ previous directorial effort with the word “Star” in the title, another small film called Star Trek Into Darkness, which was somewhat less than warmly received by Trekkies. Let me rephrase, they hated it! It’s kind of unlike a big Hollywood director to admit when he’s wrong, but Abrams seems to be now admitting he’s wrong, at least about one aspect of Into Darkness, and perhaps the most obvious.

While appearing at the Montclair Film Festival, which was recorded by Rolling Stone, Abrams enjoyed a little true confession with talk show host and alpha nerd Stephen Colbert. On the subject of what went wrong with Into Darkness, Abrams said “we got in trouble on the second ‘Star Trek‘ film with some of the fans,” adding that “there were too many nods to ‘[Star Trek II]: The Wrath of Khan.’ I’ll cop to that.”

A lot of people think that there are many egregious crimes when it comes to Into Darkness, but if there’s one thing, I think, we can all agree on, it’s that the movie was a little too in love with Wrath of Khan for it’s own good. It also thought it was way too clever, inverting the climax of Wrath of Khan and switching the Kirk and Spock roles in the save the Enterprise gambit. Loving Wrath of Khan tooo much is not a sin committed by Abrams alone, as it was definitely a big problem with Star Trek: Nemesis as well. If Star Trek is to move forward, maybe it should leave Khan alone.

Other tidbits revealed in the talk include Abrams’ promise to tone down the lens flare in Star Wars, the weird factoid that Kardue’sai’Malloc (look it up) is Abrams’ favorite Star Wars character, and the revelation that pre-Alias Jennifer Garner was Stephen Colbert’s babysitter. It’s a small world in a galaxy far, far away indeed.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is in theaters everywhere on December 18.

Source: IndieWire

Category: Film

Tags: , , ,

Advertisements