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Screen Shot 2016-07-29 at 12.13.25 AM

Now that Batman V Superman has been out of the theaters for a while and available on home release, the time for people warring about it online has all but come to pass. Fans have now set their sights on Justice League, which debuted a fantastically well-received trailer at San Diego Comic-Con. The teaser showed what appears to be a fun superhero team-up film in style of The Avengers, and managed to do the impossible – make Aquaman a total bad-ass. Fans are also giddy over the trailer for Wonder Woman which also premiered at SDCC, which looks like a feminist cross-fitter’s wet dream. Warner Bros/DC really knocked it out of the park at Comic Con and has seemingly won over every fan who ever said anything bad about Batman V Superman. But… about that. The veritable shit storm of negative reviews from critics still linger like stink on a monkey. Why, though… why are people still arguing online about how bad the movie was/is?

There’s plenty of reviews out there that explain in detail the lack of story, characterizations,  and absurd motivations (I, for one, still have no idea why the deuce Lex Luthor had it in for Superman) but it actually all comes down to one fundamental flaw – Forced Moments. What does that mean? Well, because hating on BvS never gets old, watch this new video essay from Youtuber Nerdwriter1 as he attempts to explain what the fundamental flaw is in Zack Snyder‘s comic book sequel.

Nerdwriter1 makes a really compelling fact. This was a legit argument to why the movie isn’t great. Zach Snyder films are abstract and fantasy-like in the way they are shot, the way the action flows and the way the actors perform and give dialogue. You are left with attractive images but they are not powerful images. Snyder, along with screenwriter David S Goyer, made a movie that looked like comic-book but kind of forgot that comic books tell stories too. BvS had a lot of cool looking moments that were meant to feel epic, without any build up to make them work.

The people watching this video who appreciate writing and thoughtful analysis will likely applaud. The fanboys who  absolutely adored BvS, however, will remain unconvinced. For them, it is these moments, regardless of substance, are what bestowed cinematic glory. For them, that was enough. And that’s OK.

Category: Film

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