banner

In a move that will leave many old school gamers scratching their heads, PETA has written to Games Workshop CEO Kevin Rountree requesting that the war-gaming company ban all fur garments from the game. That’s right, imaginary characters, battle-scarred, hardened warriors that wear human skulls and bones as trophies, should be wearing imaginary fake fur.

If you thought buying new figures, very expensive figures mind you, because of a rule book update or change was rough on the pocket, imagine those gamers having to but new 40K miniatures because those wearing fur figures are no longer considered game accurate. Of course, that would mean that all the Space Wolf fans would be right out of hundreds of dollars.

Here’s how PETA-UK explained the reasoning behind the request on the PETA-UK Blog site:

The grimdark, battle-hardened warriors are known for their martial prowess – but wearing the skins of dead animals doesn’t take any skill.

Indeed, nothing on the bloody battlefields of Warhammer’s conflict-ravaged universe could match the terrible reality that foxes, minks, rabbits, and other living beings experience at the hands of the fur trade. Those killed for their fur typically first endure a bleak life inside a tiny, filthy wire cage before being electrocuted, drowned, or even skinned alive. Or they may be in the wild, minding their own business, when they get caught in a horrific bone-crushing steel-jaw trap – often languishing for days before eventually dying from starvation, dehydration, or blood loss.

PETA has written to Games Workshop CEO Kevin Rountree asking that the leading British miniature war-gaming brand ban “fur” garments from all Warhammer characters. While we appreciate that they are fictional, draping them in what looks like a replica of a dead animal sends the message that wearing fur is acceptable – when, in fact, it has no more place in 2017 than it would in the year 40,000.

Here is a link to the letter sent and a picture of it:

Kevin D Rountree
Games Workshop
Willow Road
Lenton
Nottingham NG7 2WS
30 January 2017

Dear Mr Rountree,

I’m writing to you on behalf of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) to ask that you consider removing “fur” garments from your Warhammer characters at the next opportunity.
From the mighty Leman Russ and Horus Lupercal to Chaos Warriors and the Sisters of Silence, Warhammer features an abundance of characters who wear what appear to be animal pelts, which just doesn’t add up. These battle-hardened warriors are known for their martial prowess – but wearing the skins of dead animals doesn’t take any skill.

Indeed, nothing on the bloody battlefields of Warhammer’s war-torn world could match the horrific reality that foxes, minks, rabbits, and other living beings experience at the hands of the fur trade. Those killed for their fur typically first endure a bleak life inside a tiny, filthy wire cage before being electrocuted, drowned, or even skinned alive. Or they may be out minding their business and get caught in horrific bone-crushing steel-jaw traps – often languishing for days before eventually dying of hunger, thirst, or blood loss.

And while we appreciate that these are fictional characters, draping them in what looks to be a replica of a dead animal sends the message that wearing fur is acceptable – when, in fact, it has no more place in 2017 than it would in the year 40,000.

Thank you for your consideration, and I look forward to hearing from you.

Yours faithfully,
Yvonne Taylor Senior Manager of Corporate Projects PETA Foundation

Wouldn’t PETA’s time and effort be better spent than going after imaginary characters? In fact, if PETA had done any research before making this request they might have discovered that the Fenrisian Wolves are not “Wolves” at all but, are in fact the descendants of genetic alterations (on humans) that went gone spiraling out of control. Warhammer 40K explains the history below:

It has already been mentioned in various sources of official canon that the Canis Helix is responsible for the peculiar lupine traits possessed by the Astartes of the Space Wolves Chapter. It is also hinted that perhaps the Fenrisian Wolves are actually Astartes whose genetic alteration has spiraled out of control, reshaping them into bestial creatures. This would explain how and why these supposed “wolves” fight alongside the Space Wolves in battle and readily obey their Astartes masters in the heat of battle, perhaps retaining some fragment of their former lives and sense of duty.

But this does not explain how “wolves” have existed on Fenris since before the first Space Marines of the VI Legion came to Fenris. It is generally known that during this earlier age when Mankind colonised the galaxy that humanity possessed advanced genetic engineering technology. For those early settlers that colonised the inhospitable, icy Death World of Fenris, they may have attempted to find a way to adapt themselves to the harsh environments of their new homeworld, splicing their DNA through gene-manipulation with that of Terran wolves that were more suited to the arctic conditions and climatic extremes. One could extrapolate that this would have provided the Fenrisian colonists with a fighting chance at surviving this hellish environment. In some cases this manipulation must have had unforeseen consequences.

Perhaps the first generation of “wolves” came from the original gene-tailored colonists that devolved over time until their genetic alterations stabilised, creating the first Fenrisian Wolves.

That means those are not really wolf pelts, but the pelts of descendants of genetically altered humans. In the long run, there’s little doubt that Wahammer 40K will have some answer for PETA, but changing the figures seems unlikely as well as the fact that most gamers would just ignore the results and play with whatever figure they want to anyway.

Category: Nerd Culture

Tags: , ,

Advertisements