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Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers was perfectly harmless. I mean, if you ignored the hysteria of some parents groups worried about their kids karate chopping their friends on the playground. But the series was about five clean-cut teens who were always working out, or community organizing when they weren’t fighting rubber monsters in spandex. Angel Grove was so clean cut even the bullies hanged out at the juice bar, but as with all reboots, you’re going to have to forget all that. In this Power Rangers, the heroes are a post-modern breakfast club fighting the creature from the black lagoon, and then things get weird. (more…)

This is the end, or close to it. Being the penultimate episode of Legion’s first season, “Chapter 7” was bound to be, ahem, more straightforward than its previous installments. Like trying to put one’s desperately fractured psyche together, Legion faced the ultimate test in its second-to-last hour: it had to start making sense of itself. Not an easy chore, but in the end, the show made it look way too easy. So much so that I wondered what exactly the show was going to end up doing with its last hour. I forgot the cardinal rule of anything X-Men-related though: there’s always another world ending problem to solve. (more…)

TV RECAP/REVIEW: ‘The Flash’ S3E17 “Duets”

When a small show called Glee aired on Fox in May of 2009, a television phenomenon was birthed. So when two popular characters from that show joined the same network as The Flash and Supergirl, it only made sense (sarcasm) that their shows crossover for a musical number. For some, it may be the last thing they want to see their favorite superhero or show involved in. But for the rest of the audience, it can be a change in pace, a moment of nostalgia, and a surprisingly fun time. Titled, “Duets,” this week’s episode of The Flash brings in a third member for the reunion to teach some lost lover a lesson on life. As always, there are tons of spoilers inside. You’ve been warned.

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If there’s a life lesson we can glean from tonight’s very special episode of Supergirl, “Star-Crossed,” it’s a simple one: Whatever you do, don’t lie to your Kryptonian girlfriend. She won’t forgive and she won’t forget. It’s in their/her nature, apparently. Something about how all of that integrity leads to self-righteousness and such. Poor Mon-El (Chris Wood), though. Little did he know that hiding a very minor fact about his background – that he’s the Crown Prince of Daxam, his home planet, presumed lost in the conflagration that destroyed Daxam’s sister planet, Krypton – would lead to the end of his all-too-brief (for him) romance with Kara Zor-El/Supergirl (Melissa Benoist). By episode’s end, Mon-El/Kara romance has been broken asunder and no man, woman (Kryptonian or Daxamite) can change it.

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When we last left Twin Peaks (at least so far as the purposes of this series of recap), Agent Cooper had his big breakthrough in the case of who killed Laura Palmer, and it came from a weirdly disjointed, but code-filled, dream sequence. Who was Bob? Who was Mike? Who was the little man? And what did Laura/not-Laura whisper to him? If you thought the answers would be straightforward, then you must be thinking of some other show. But the consequential episode pushed on a key idea of the series so far, that there’s a lot more to Twin Peaks than meets the eye.  (more…)

If you thought you could predict where Legion was going at this point, you’ve clearly not been paying attention because while last week built to an uncertain confrontation between David’s demons, his friends, and his pursuers, we then smashed cut back to the mental hospital. So what was this psychic sojourn into the land of drugs and pie going to reveal? That’s not immediately apparent, but it appears that it involves fudging with time again, and given the fact that Legion was just renewed for a second season today, I’m not very optimistic that things will be tied off in a nice bow before this run is done. (more…)

It’s easy to wake up every morning and wish you were someone else. For example, a super hero. But it’s really easy to forget the burden that some of these heroes have to carry. Surely this has been said and done, but on this week’s episode of The Flash, “Into The Speed Force,” the consequences of our heroes come to fruition. One by one, old faces come back to remind Barry that he can’t keep dictating the rules. As always, Barry has a plan. So there’s no need to worry. Warning: There will definitely be spoilers inside.

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It’s hard to say who’s in a lonelier place, as the title of this week’s Riverdale refers to. Poor Forsythe Pendleton “Jughead” Jones III, living under the stairs of the school like a poor man’s Harry Potter, is certainly in a lonely place, struggling to keep his family drama under wraps, and hoping that his father, living hopelessly and nearly always half-drunk in the family trailer, will pull his act together. Betty is also in a lonely place, wanting to desperately to help her sister but caught in the competing demands of two families that hate each other. Hey, someone give these two kids a break. (more…)

After weeks of “What the?” Legion finally started to make sense this week. I’m not sure if that’s a good development or a bad development (yet), but for a superhero show that has enjoy toying with your ability to believe what you’re seeing, as you’re seeing it, a little bit of clarity can be as surprising as the longest con game plot twist a writer can conceive. So just when you thought that David might have found some inner peace, comes the revelation that the powerful mutant everyone thought had schizophrenia but didn’t, might actually have bigger problems that aren’t too far off the original diagnosis. (more…)

Back in the mid-fifties, the American distributor of Godzilla (Gojira) attached “King of the Monsters” as a subtitle. A bold claim, sure, but more importantly, a slap in the face of the giant gorilla, Kong, crowned King two decades earlier. Kong might have been born and bred on fictional Skull Island, but he was for all intents and purposes, an American creation. A potent, if unintentional, riff on American slavery, racism, and lonely, misunderstood outsider, albeit an outsider with a thing for screaming blondes and deadly skyscrapers (they reminded him of home), King Kong hit the zeitgeist mother lode, entering pop culture where he’s remained for the better part of a century. A sequel followed, Son of Kong, a couple of low-rent, embarrassing appearances on the Japanese side of the Pacific Ocean, a lightly regarded remake (1976), a sequel, another remake directed by Peter Jackson 12 years ago and now, finally an all-new origin story, a Kong for the 21st century, but still a part of the late 20th century. (more…)