reviews

American Gods Party

Last week’s episode of American Gods was one of the weakest of the season. As stated before, it didn’t really feel like a penultimate episode and probably should have switched around with the previous week. Learning about Essie McGowan (who looked eerily similar to Laura Moon) and her devotion to Mad Sweeny didn’t add much overall, but it did deliver fine performances by Pablo Schreiber and Emily Browning as they were the central characters that episode. However, we still have the Cold War between the Old Gods and the New Gods. Thank goodness for this week!

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With Episode 6, Twin Peaks proves that even though you may not know where it’s going, it can still give you an emotional reaction whether that’s humour, horror, or grief, and you got all three in this week’s edition. I don’t know if this new Twin Peaks is David Lynch dumping every idea he’s had for the last 27 years into one narrative, or whether he’s punking TV recappers and fans that like to turn over every rock on set for every little clue, but I do know that the developments on this week’s episode had me hypnotically transfixed from one hilarious moment to the next utterly shocking moment.  (more…)

Throw An American Werewolf in London, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Lifeforce, the ’99 Mummy remake, and Dawn of the Dead: Zack Snyder Edition, into a figurative blender. Subtract everything you love about those movies and the misshapen, shambling, stitched-together mess that results would look a lot like Alex Kurtzman’s The Mummy, Universal’s desperate attempt to kickstart their own interconnected cinematic universe to rival Marvel or DC and their multi-billion dollar grosses. Without any superheroes of their own, Universal did what any major studio with Fast & Furious money would do: They dug deep into their century-old back catalog and came up with the so-called “Dark Universe,” a shared universe starring Universal’s “famous monsters.” If the stillborn The Mummy is any indication, though, the “Dark Universe” has failure written all over it. And Tom “Mr. 120%” Cruise isn’t to blame, at least not completely. A badly underwritten script pieced together from the work of six credited writers deserves most of the blame. (more…)

American Gods Vulcan and Wednesday

Last week on American Gods, we got our first real confrontation between the Old Gods and New Gods as Wednesday and Shadow came face to face with Mr. World. We got to see the full extent of his power as he literally has all the power of “the world.” Although he went to great lengths to ensure that Wednesday and Shadow could be in police custody for their meeting, he continued to reaffirm that the Old Gods were not the New Gods’ enemy (despite the Technical Boy wanting to kill Wednesday and Shadow), and they could help the Old Gods by way of rebranding. Despite the good intentions, the New Gods are not to be messed with as some sort of tree monster laid waste to all those in the police department, and even left a parting gift for Shadow.

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There comes a point when you’ve got to ask yourself, what will it take for someone to realize that something is desperately wrong with Dougie? Or perhaps to put it another way, what was so desperately wrong with Dougie that no one seems to notice how strangely this person is acting? Or maybe blissful ignorance is the hallmark of the Twin Peaks universe, but as we continued the journey of Dougie, I mean Agent Cooper, it was foremost in my mind how Dougie can be walking around acting like a spaced out weirdo and no one in his life seems to notice/give a damn. (more…)

At least I wasn’t alone. In evaluating the first two episode of the relaunched Twin Peaks it seemed like many people weren’t really into whatever the heck and David Lynch and Mark Frost were doing. It was weird for the sake of being weird, full of non-sequiturs and oddities, and they dealt precious little with the titular town or any of the menagerie of beloved characters left behind in 1991. I’m not sure if the turn was purposeful, but admittedly, it did seem like a little bit of that old Twin Peaks peered out from behind the bushes in episodes three and four. (more…)

If the recent, already forgotten Internet meme of the rotting corpse of an unidentified giant sea creature came back miraculously to zombified half-life, it would like, sound, not to mention smell like Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, the fifth overlong, over-directed, over-everything entry no one seems to want or care about with the exception of Disney (they have $.37 billion reasons) or Johnny Depp (in desperate need, once again, of a career revitalizer). To be fair, even as American moviegoers gave the last, underwhelming entry, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, close to a pass (relative to a typically bloated budget), international audiences fully embraced On Stranger Tides. In short, we have international audiences to blame for foisting one more, hopefully last entry in the theme-park-ride-turned-improbable movie-franchise and maybe one more after Disney counts international box-office returns from entry No. 5.

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For this week’s episode, and season finale, of The Flash, “Finish Line” is quite the appropriate title. Not only are there so many meanings behind the phrase, but there are questions that it raises for next season and the future of the series. If you were lucky enough to catch it live, then you were a witness to one of the coolest scenes in super hero television in a some time. If you haven’t seen it yet, then you should probably go and do so before finishing this sentence. Warning: There will be a lot of spoilers ahead.

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When we last saw Supergirl/Kara Danvers/Kara Zor-El/Girl of Steel (Melissa Benoist), in Season 2’s penultimate episode, “Resist,” she was on the wrong end of a super punch from none other than Superman/Kal-El (Tyler Hoechlin). Under Rhea’s (Teri Hatcher) control (no) thanks to silver Krpytonite (if you didn’t know silver Kryptonite existed, you’re not alone), Superman doesn’t see Supergirl; he sees his greatest, all-time foe, General Zod (Mark Gibbon). After a mutually semi-destructive pounding aboard Rhea’s flagship, Supergirl and Superman find themselves back in National City, kicking, punching, and throwing each other around a water fountain. Somehow, Supergirl gets the better of her more famous cousin, knocking the noxious effects of silver Kryptonite with one, final super punch. It’s called Supergirl and not Superman, after all.  (more…)

I feel like Krusty the Klown having just watching the adventures of “Worker and Parasite”, Eastern Europe’s favourite cat and mouse team. Showtime‘s revival of Twin Peaks was highly anticipated, but it will be interesting to see what people think of the two first new episodes of the series since 1991. In short, depending on how it all turns out, Twin Peaks 2017 will either be the epitome of everything director David Lynch does well, or everything that Peak TV does badly. The tagline for the series is “It’s happening again,” and if by that they mean the weirdness, symbolism and non-sequiturs, then yes, it is happening again.  (more…)