Damon Lindelof

HBO and Damon Lindelof are setting up a pilot for a ‘Watchmen’ TV series. Watchmen is the 1986-87 comic series that was written by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.  The series is set to be a part of the same universe as the comic, but have new characters.  The property was previously made into a film in 2009 directed by Zack Snyder. (more…)

Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen comic is a timeless classic. The limited series graphic novel has a rich history as being one of the greatest graphic novels ever created. The alternative history murder mystery surrounding former superheroes employed by the government was a deconstruction of the idea of the superhero and was infused with politics as well as the idea of a “dark side” to heroes and has always been heralded as a perfect story. For a long time, the series was deemed “unfilmable” by its creators. Zack Snyder did a fairly accurate film adaptation of the comic back in 2009 that was met with mixed results. Some thought it was too much like the comic and others thought that the ending didn’t ring true to the original (changing the surprise at the end). The Director’s Cut of the film helped flesh it out even more than the theatrical cut. Either way, it was a worthy effort. Recently there have been talks about a reboot for the comic and it looks like we might get a TV adaptation.

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STAR TREK

He may be basking in the reported glow of Star Wars: The Force Awakensawesomeness (I say reported because some of us haven’t seen it yet), but J.J. Abrams is still having trouble living down the ghosts of sci-fi movies past. Previous to Star Wars, Abrams made Star Trek and Star Trek Into Darkness; one of those was by and large well received, the other was not. In true confession mode in a recent interview, Abrams confirmed that, yes, mistakes were made in the making of Into Darkness, and a lot of that had to do with him boldly trying to keep a lid on his infamous mystery box. (more…)

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Bird Bird can do wrong. The Iron Giant is a masterpiece, The Incredibles is perhaps the best comic book movie ever made, Ratatouille is endlessly charming, and his first live-action movie, Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, is the best of the series and the one that best captures the aesthetic of the original TV show. So when Bird shirked directorial responsibilities on Star Wars: The Force Awakens and dared to make something original, a giant mystery box called Tomorrowland, it was a bold choice, a daring choice. But a batting streak like Bird’s was bound to run dry sometime, and while Tomorrowland isn’t a mess on par with, say, Chappie, it does show tremendous strain in its execution. (more…)

 

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Prometheus was an adequate enough introduction back into Ridley Scott‘s Alien universe. A lot of questions were left unanswered, but that is part of the beauty of the Science Fiction genre; a sense of mystery, room to theorize, to talk with others and debate and learn in a reciprocal manner. It’s not any secret that Ridley Scott is a Sci-Fi auteur; master of his craft. He creates movies that have individuals’ thinking for themselves and developing their own interpretations (Blade Runner and whether Deckard is a replicant or not anyone?).  With Prometheus, it seems one of the main problems that irked some of the fans was the fact the movie wasn’t a direct prequel to the Alien series as was originally planned. Some were annoyed that Damon Lindelof had been called in to tinker with the script (which makes one wonder how Lindelof haters feel about Green Lantern‘ scriber Michael Green penning the sequel) . The fact it is set in the same universe should have been enough to suffice no? Apparently not! Apparently people wanted more of the same. Well, word on the street is that Ridley Scott has been dishing some dirt on his plans for the highly anticipated sequel. (more…)

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He co-wrote a screenplay featuring a giant robot scrotum with Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen. He helped load The Amazing Spider-Man 2 with so much plot detail that they barely had any room for a story or character. He participated in the silly is-he-Khan or isn’t-he debate for Star Trek Into Darkness. He’s the most divisive screenwriter in Hollywood, and now Roberto Orci is crowing that he’s finished the first draft of his follow-up to STID, putting the flick on track for that important and symbolic 2016 release date. (more…)

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It looks like Damon Lindelof has taken his final internet ass-kicking on Twitter as the prolific writer/producer has seemingly deleted his Twitter account. I know cyber-bullying is a hot issue right now, but to think that even a Hollywood player like Lindelof can have his ego so shattered that he gives up his Twitter account… Well boy, I don’t know. (more…)

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Damon Lindelof is one of the busiest screenwriters currently in show business, and it’s all thanks to his six years show running Lost. Well, we all know how that ended, and if we had forgotten, the internet reminded us the other night following the final episode of Breaking Bad.

Lindelof was recruited to write a piece commemorating the end of Breaking Bad by The Hollywood Reporter, and at some point it turned into a pseudo-apology slash admission of guilt concerning the alleged crapiness of the end of Lost.  “I agreed to write this piece because I am deeply and unhealthily obsessed with finding ways to revisit the Lost finale and the maddening hurricane of shit that has followed it,” Lindelof wrote.

“In the comments section of the piece I did not write, the following sentiment would have been echoed dozens of times over: ‘What the f— do you know because you f—ed up Lost?!?'” he continued. “How do I know this? Well, for starters, my Twitter feed was pretty much a unanimous run of, “Did you see that, Lindelof? That’s how you end a show.”

That’s true, and some of it was pretty nasty. Still, Lindelof admits that he’s got a problem. “Alcoholics are smart enough to not walk into a bar,” he explained. “My bar is Twitter. It’s Comic-Con. It’s anytime someone asks me to write an article even casually relating to Lost.

“And what do I do? I jump at the opportunity to acknowledge how many people were dissatisfied with how it ended. I try to be self-deprecating and witty when I do this, but that’s an elaborate (or obvious?) defense mechanism to let people know I’m fully aware of the elephant in the room and I’m perfectly fine with it sitting down on my face and shitting all over me.”

Well, there’s an image. Lindelof goes on to say that he’s tired of the fight, and that he appreciates the quiet number of Lost fans who are fans of the finale and feel like lepers because of it. So he’s decided to offer us a truce:

“I’d like to make a pact, you and me,” he said. “And here’s your part: You acknowledge that I know how you feel about the ending of Lost. I got it. I heard you. I will think about your dissatisfaction always and forever. It will stay with me until I lie there on my back dying, camera pulling slowly upward whether it be a solitary dog or an entire SWAT team that comes to my side as I breathe my last breath.

“And here’s my part: I will finally stop talking about it. I’m not doing this because I feel entitled or above it — I’m doing it because I accept that I will not change hearts nor minds. I will not convince you they weren’t dead the whole time, nor resent you for believing they were despite my infinite declarations otherwise.”

There. Everybody happy now? That’s what I thought. But because he can, Lindelof decided to get one last word in before signing off.

“I stand by the Lost finale,” he said. “It’s the story that we wanted to tell, and we told it. No excuses. No apologies. I look back on it as fondly as I look back on the process of writing the whole show. And while I’ll always care what you think, I can’t be a slave to it anymore. Here’s why: I did it for me. I liked it. I was good at it. And I was really … I was alive.”

So there you go, internet, you won. Lindelof is broken-ish. Lesson learned.

Source: Blastr

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Last night’s series finale of Breaking Bad was excellent, and people seemed to have really responded to it. In what was the most anticipated episode of series television since the series finale of Lost, Breaking Bad not only secured 10.3 million viewers, but it was a critical success and a rave with fans of the show was well. As we all know, the reception to the finale of Lost was somewhat less than congenial. Oh forget it, people hated the crap out of it. But still, three years on you’d figure that fans might have gotten over it. And you’d be wrong.

As Breaking Bad drew to a close, fans of the show took to Twitter to voice their satisfaction with the finale – by mocking Lost co-creator Damon Lindelof and his lack off finale writing finesse. In fact, Lindelof was getting so much Twitter traffic, he decided to re-tweet some of the sass of he was getting.

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breaking batman

Damon Lindelof – some find him to be a brilliant writer, including all of those in Hollywood that keep giving him job after job.  Others of us think a bit less of the man, annoyed with his tendency to use intentional obscurity to spice up his scripts.  But whatever you think of him, he has his fame and when he has something to say, people listen.  And he does have something to say right now, and it’s about how Breaking Bad’s Walter White and Batman are the same character at their core.  Check it al out after the jump:

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