nichelle nichols

There were really three groups of actors on the original Star Trek series:

The leading actors: William ShatnerLeonard Nimoy, and Deforrest Kelley.

There were the  weekly and occasionally recurring guest stars.   These were people like Richard Kiel (Jaws in the Bond films), Joan Collins, Roger C. Carmel (Harry Mudd), etc.

But the strength of the show is often measured in the strength of its supporting regular cast.  Scotty (James Doohan), Uhura (Nichelle Nichols), Sulu (George Takei) and Checkov (Walter Koenig) were often used as set dressing and had little to do.  But when they had something to do, they did it well and memorably.

Here are some facts about the actors that gave space for Shatner’s overacting:

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george-takei

F. Scott Fitzgerald once said that there were no second acts in American life, and although that one line’s been continually disproved, we revisit the idea whenever someone of note begins their second act. Even their third act. I’m not sure what act George Takei is on in his play of life, but at 77 years old he’s enjoying rare universal popularity, and it’s not just because he’s one of the beloved members of the original cast of Star Trek. As an advocate for marriage equality, a living historical resource detailing the internment of Japanese-Americans, and a working actor with over 175 credits to his name (and growing), Takei’s got more to offer at 77 than some men less than half his age. Just about all of it, is touched on in some way in the documentary To Be Takei. (more…)

This day in 1966 Star Trek first beamed its way on to American airwaves and however unlikely it seemed, began leaving its mark on pop culture. The voyages of the Enterprise crew – Kirk, Spock, Bones, Scotty, Uhura, Sulu, and Chekov (and occasionally Nurse Chapel or Yeoman Rand) – were only transmitted for three years but thanks to years of syndication Star Trek eventually involved into a phenomenon of six movies, later birthing six more movies and five other television series. The most fervent fans – Trekkies, or Trekkers as some preferred to be called – spearheaded the convention-going culture we today enjoy across many fandoms. Basically, much of what comprises our “geek” culture owes a large debt to Star Trek. It’s been a tent pole among nerdy interests for over four decades!

But even with all that rich history, it’s the original crew that has become the most iconic. Those actors – William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, James Doohan, Nichelle Nichols, George Takei, and Walter Koenig –  were forever typecast and depending on when you asked them it was either for better or worse. It was their Enterprise crew J.J. Abrams sought to re-imagine in his 2009 reboot of the series, a film almost universally loved by fans old and new. And  today, fans internet-wide are still putting their own stamp on Gene Roddenberry‘s original “Wagon Train to the stars,” with fan fiction, fan art, cosplay, and even fan produced movies and web series.

Star Trek is more alive now than it ever was, and it seems the days of being ashamed by your intense love for phasers, red shirts, and Romulans – not to mention their ale – are far behind us. If you’ve never given Star Trek‘s original series a shot because you thought it looked campy – it is – then you’re missing out on what is genuinely a fantastic show with wonderful writing, heartfelt performances, and excellent explorations of the relationships between its characters. You’re allowed to laugh when the set looks a little shaky, or an alien monster’s zipper is clearly apparent, or when Shatner performs a little too enthusiastically. That’s part of the charm. And sure, there will be truly awful, almost unwatchable episodes, too. But for every “Spock’s Brain” there’s plenty of “Balance of Terror,” “Amok Time,” or “The City on the Edge of Forever.”

Today every episode of Star Trek can be streamed online, for free, from a variety of sources. The most free, meaning you don’t have to already have a subscription to Netflix or Amazon Prime, is on CBS’ own TV.com. You could even renact history by tonight at 8:30 pm ET watching “The Map Trap,” the first aired episode of Star Trek. I like it because it heavily features Dr. McCoy, my favorite character, but I’m not kidding you when I say the villain is salt-sucking vampire creature. Seriously.

To sign off, I’ll leave with the immortal words of Phillip J. Fry from Futurama‘s “Where No Fan Has Gone Before,”

‘Cause it-it taught me so much. Like how you should accept people. Whether they be black, white, Klingon, or even female. But most importantly, when I didn’t have any friends, it-it made me feel like maybe I did.

An inspiration to his fans, many of which became engineers because of him, James Doohan famously played Scottish Chief Engineer Montgomery “Scotty” Scott in the television and film series Star Trek. Since his untimely passing due to pneumonia, James’ ashes have been resting comfortably at their final rest place except for the one-quarter ounce now floating in high above the planet.

Shortly before his death in 2005, James requested that the portion of his ashes be saved, continuing the tradition of sci-fi heroes launching themselves into the great beyond. According to TrekMovie.com, after a failed attempt in 2008 and a launch delay this past Saturday, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket was successfully launched yesterday, holding a payload of canisters – one of which held the ashes of the former TV and movie star.

Check out the launch below:

Several members of the Hollywood community including long time friends Leonard Nimoy and Nichelle Nichols, as well as current Scotty, Simon Pegg, paid their final respects to the sci-fi icon via Twitter. The capsule containing James’ ashes will continue to float aimlessly in Earth’s atmosphere, until harmlessly burning up upon reentry next year.

Source: Geekologie

Every day the internet produces an astounding amount of goodies and gems. Most hilarious, some amusing, but all worth at least a few seconds of your time. We here at Nerd Bastards try to bring you the best bits of news and nerdery the webz has to offer, with a bit of snark thrown in. But sometimes not everything makes the cut. Monday through Friday we’ll be bringing you our inbox leftovers, our forgotten bookmarks, the nerdy bits that simply slipped through the cracks. You can submit items to Nerdy Bits by emailing us at nerdybits@nerdbastards.com.

ABOVE: That’s right, our President’s a Trekkie. Either that or this photo was taken at a secret White House meeting with the very first Vulcan ambassadors. And then of course, Obama calls in his top extra-terrestrial expert, Nichelle Nichols. (Laughing Squid)

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Spock Originally Written as a Woman

 

Back in the day all you had to know about Spock was:

Beard = Evil Spock

No Beard = Good Spock

Recently Nichelle Nichols dropped a casting photon torpedo while being interviewed on the Science Channel’s special documentary Trek Nation. Nichols let loose with the story that when she first auditioned for Star Trek, she was asked to read the script for the part of Spock, Kirk’s beloved Vulcan bromance. Nichelle said:

“They gave me a three-page script to read from that had three characters named Bones, Kirk and somebody called Spock, and they asked me if I would read for the role of Spock. When I looked at this great text, I said to myself, ‘I’ll take any one of these roles,’ but I found the Spock character to be very interesting, and I asked them to tell me what she [Spock] was like.”

Think about that. Not only would Spock have been female, but African American as well. Could 60’s television America handle that one? Paramount executives and Star Trek producers obviously couldn’t. Of course many changes are made in the production process of putting a show on television or making a movie. There must have been rewrites galore. Not that I am complaining, without Nimoy as Spock, SciFi fandom would has lost one of the greatest Bromances ever known.

What I’m interested about is that this story has never come up in the last 20 years of conventions, interviews, and apperances. This story would be convention panel gold.

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