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Last week’s previews teased a fate worse than death for Alex Danvers (Chyler Leigh), a painfully prolonged death by drowning courtesy of the villain-of-the-week (also weak),Rick (David Hoflin) and his obsession with Tarsem Singh’s The Cell. No, not really, but this week’s episode, appropriately titled “Alex,” takes The Cell’s central motif, death by drowning to a timer as video cameras roll, and gets within inches of Alex losing her life. Spoiler alert: Alex doesn’t die. She’s too key, too central to Supergirl the TV series and Supergirl/Kara Danvers (Melissa Benoist), her adoptive sister. Alex often plays big sister to Kara, dropping in with well-placed pep talks about Kara’s personal and professional life, helping to ground her younger, punch-first, ask-questions-later. In Supergirl’s second season, however, Alex’s personal journey – her coming out, her romance with Maggie Sawyer (Floriana Lima) – has emerged into one of the more compelling storylines, thanks in large part to the sensitive writing, directing, and performances. (more…)

The nanobots are here. The nanobots are here. It was only a matter of time, of course, before Supergirl’s latest episode, “Ace Reporter,” went where comic books – and science fiction for that matter – have gone before: Nanotechnology run amok. As always, it’s not a good idea to mess with Father time or Mother Nature. And it’s definitely not a good idea to introduce an entirely new, revolutionary product that will change the world without running a few tests, maybe even a few tests on human subjects, especially since said revolutionary product, flying, drone-like nanobots, operate in a swarm, complete with swarm intelligence. The culprit for unleashing the nanobot swarm on Nation City, the city Supergirl has promised to protect? One Jack Spheer (Rahul Kohli, iZombie), an Elon Musk-like inventor with massive amounts of venture behind him and a messiah complex. He’s also Lena Luthor’s (Katie McGrath) ex, as in ex-boyfriend and ex-partner in a onetime start-up that went nowhere. That is , until Spheer shows up in National City with his shiny, new toys.

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When we left Supergirl (Melissa Benoist) in last week’s “Star-Crossed” episode, she had dumped Mon-El (Chris Wood) for telling not just a lie, but a Big Lie. Mon-El wasn’t a lowly palace guard who miraculously survived the destruction of Daxam, Krypton’s sister planet, but the Crown Prince of Daxam, the heir to the royal throne occupied by his dictatorial, autocratic parents, Rhea (Teri Hatcher, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman) and Lar Gand (Kevin Sorbo, Hercules). She wasn’t willing to forgive or forget. In fact, she proved herself more than just a super human. She proved herself to be a champion grudge holder too. All looked lost for Mon-El and Supergirl’s romance, but a very special guest star, the Music Meister (Darren Criss, Glee), stepped in at the nth moment to save the day, albeit in a roundabout way. The Music Meister knocked Supergirl out with some weird hypno-eye thing. Stripped of her superpowers, Supergirl found herself in a 1940s gangster-themed musical. So did Barry Allen/The Flash (Grant Gustin) once Mon-El and Team Supergirl opened a portal into the Flash’s universe. By the end of the crossover episode, Supergirl and Mon-El were back together again as a couple (probably the shortest break-up involving TV superheroes). (more…)

As the Season Finale of The Walking Dead looms on the horizon, this week’s episode delivers on a key moment in the build up to the imminent showdown with Negan. Almost surprisingly, Sasha returns this week after having magically survived her banzai mission to kill Negan, while Rick and the gang keep making moves to gather enough guns to enlist the Junkyardigans. Read on and prepare for spoilers for The Walking Dead. (more…)

If there’s a life lesson we can glean from tonight’s very special episode of Supergirl, “Star-Crossed,” it’s a simple one: Whatever you do, don’t lie to your Kryptonian girlfriend. She won’t forgive and she won’t forget. It’s in their/her nature, apparently. Something about how all of that integrity leads to self-righteousness and such. Poor Mon-El (Chris Wood), though. Little did he know that hiding a very minor fact about his background – that he’s the Crown Prince of Daxam, his home planet, presumed lost in the conflagration that destroyed Daxam’s sister planet, Krypton – would lead to the end of his all-too-brief (for him) romance with Kara Zor-El/Supergirl (Melissa Benoist). By episode’s end, Mon-El/Kara romance has been broken asunder and no man, woman (Kryptonian or Daxamite) can change it.

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Back in the mid-fifties, the American distributor of Godzilla (Gojira) attached “King of the Monsters” as a subtitle. A bold claim, sure, but more importantly, a slap in the face of the giant gorilla, Kong, crowned King two decades earlier. Kong might have been born and bred on fictional Skull Island, but he was for all intents and purposes, an American creation. A potent, if unintentional, riff on American slavery, racism, and lonely, misunderstood outsider, albeit an outsider with a thing for screaming blondes and deadly skyscrapers (they reminded him of home), King Kong hit the zeitgeist mother lode, entering pop culture where he’s remained for the better part of a century. A sequel followed, Son of Kong, a couple of low-rent, embarrassing appearances on the Japanese side of the Pacific Ocean, a lightly regarded remake (1976), a sequel, another remake directed by Peter Jackson 12 years ago and now, finally an all-new origin story, a Kong for the 21st century, but still a part of the late 20th century. (more…)

From the first, ultra-violent, gory confrontation between a drunk, alcoholic Wolverine/Logan/James Howlett (Hugh Jackman) and three of the unluckiest gangbangers ever put on film, Logan, Jackman’s second collaboration with writer-director James Mangold (The Wolverine, 3:10 to Yuma, Night & Day, Cop Land) and reportedly his last time out as the title character, announces itself as a new, different superhero movie and not just because it’s R-rated (we saw plenty of ultra-violence last February with Deadpool) but because Mangold, his screenwriting partner, Scott Frank (The Lookout, The Interpreter, Minority Report, Out of Sight, Get Shorty), and Jackman, every bit a co-equal partner, go where no superhero genre movie has gone before: Into exploring the long-term physical, mental, and emotional consequences of living above and beyond what we otherwise consider normal or natural with depth, nuance, and genuine emotion. All this achieved with stakes – saving a life, saving a handful of lives – would be considered marginal, tangential, or even irrelevant in the typically overblown, bombastic superhero entries from Marvel, DC, or the X-Men universe prior to Logan. (more…)

When we last left Supergirl/Kara Danvers (Melissa Benoist) and Mon-El (Chris Woods), they were all but set to seal the deal. As expected, the deal was indeed sealed, albeit off-screen. Mon-El wakes up in post-sex happy mode the morning after, only to find himself alone in Kara’s bed. Before self-doubt starts to take hold, though, Supergirl reappears with some coffee and a big smile on her face. While Mon-El slept, Supergirl did what real superheroes do: She thwarted a few petty crimes and saved a few lives on her way back from the cafe. All seems super-right with Supergirl’s world: She’s keeping National City safe from dangers domestic and foreign (and alien). She has a day job she apparently loves as a reporter for CatGo Media (though we’ve barely seen her at work in recent episodes), and she’s connected on a deep emotional and physical level with Mon-El (maybe not emotionally). It helps that she doesn’t break Mon-El’s nose when they kiss, a problem apparently suffered by Kara’s human suitors.

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When we last saw Kara Danvers / Supergirl (Melissa Benoist), she was just about to give in into her Kryptonian hormonal urges and seal the deal with fellow super-powered alien (Daxamite), Mon-El (Chris Wood). Before they could complete lip-lock, a bizarre, inter dimensional being, Mr. Mxyzptlk (Peter Gadiot), crashed their romantic party, claiming he was Supergirl’s No. 1 Super-fan/Ultimate Fanboy and asking for Supergirl’s hand in matrimony. Perplexed, not to mention flummoxed, Supergirl hemmed and stalled until Mr. Mxyzptlk left the building, but his sudden disappearance  didn’t mean he was gone for good; it meant the opposite. Mr. Mxyzptlk was nothing more than a stalker, albeit a stalker with near omnipotence (think of a love-obsessed Q from Star Trek: The Next Generation or the Great Kazoo from The Flintstones).

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Within two weeks, we will see Hugh Jackman’s final ride as Wolverine in Logan. Jackman has played the titular character since 2000’s X-Men one of the first successful comic book movies that kickstarted our current “superhero cinema” phase. Although Jackman was taller than his comic book counterpart, he has encapsulated the core of the character very well. At the age of 48, he has decided to hang up his claws and Logan will be is final outing. Many critics have already seen the movie at press screenings over the last few weeks.  However, they were barred from saying anything due to a press embargo. Well, that embargo was lifted at 4:30 PM yesterday and now the reviews are flooding in. So how did Logan do?

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