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Twin Peaks

So what did you think of this week’s Twin Peaks? The good news is you’ve got two weeks to figure out what just happened, the bad news is that two weeks is only about 25 per cent of the time you’ll need to even begin to try and decode everything. If you thought David Lynch was being purposefully obstinate and aloof thus far, you were not prepared for whatever the hell just happened in episode 8. Perhaps Lynch thought he and Mark Frost were being too direct last week by actually moving the narrative forward, but only Lynch can dedicate an hour of cable TV to a master thesis in media art.  (more…)

Here we are at Twin Peaks episode 7. It’s the beginning of the second act (if we are to split the series into three groups of six episodes), and let’s consider the idea that the number 7 itself has been a significant number in the world of Twin Peaks. So what would the seventh episode of the revival give us? Clarity, I think was the hope. Lord knows that despite how much we’ve been enjoying the zaniness and the weirdness we would really like to see some sign that the series is out to tell a story and is not being used as a dumping ground for every odd thought that David Lynch has had in the last quarter century… (more…)

With Episode 6, Twin Peaks proves that even though you may not know where it’s going, it can still give you an emotional reaction whether that’s humour, horror, or grief, and you got all three in this week’s edition. I don’t know if this new Twin Peaks is David Lynch dumping every idea he’s had for the last 27 years into one narrative, or whether he’s punking TV recappers and fans that like to turn over every rock on set for every little clue, but I do know that the developments on this week’s episode had me hypnotically transfixed from one hilarious moment to the next utterly shocking moment.  (more…)

There comes a point when you’ve got to ask yourself, what will it take for someone to realize that something is desperately wrong with Dougie? Or perhaps to put it another way, what was so desperately wrong with Dougie that no one seems to notice how strangely this person is acting? Or maybe blissful ignorance is the hallmark of the Twin Peaks universe, but as we continued the journey of Dougie, I mean Agent Cooper, it was foremost in my mind how Dougie can be walking around acting like a spaced out weirdo and no one in his life seems to notice/give a damn. (more…)

At least I wasn’t alone. In evaluating the first two episode of the relaunched Twin Peaks it seemed like many people weren’t really into whatever the heck and David Lynch and Mark Frost were doing. It was weird for the sake of being weird, full of non-sequiturs and oddities, and they dealt precious little with the titular town or any of the menagerie of beloved characters left behind in 1991. I’m not sure if the turn was purposeful, but admittedly, it did seem like a little bit of that old Twin Peaks peered out from behind the bushes in episodes three and four. (more…)

I feel like Krusty the Klown having just watching the adventures of “Worker and Parasite”, Eastern Europe’s favourite cat and mouse team. Showtime‘s revival of Twin Peaks was highly anticipated, but it will be interesting to see what people think of the two first new episodes of the series since 1991. In short, depending on how it all turns out, Twin Peaks 2017 will either be the epitome of everything director David Lynch does well, or everything that Peak TV does badly. The tagline for the series is “It’s happening again,” and if by that they mean the weirdness, symbolism and non-sequiturs, then yes, it is happening again.  (more…)

It’s been a while, but when we last left the town (and show) of Twin Peaks, Agent Cooper had been shot, and so had Leo Johnson. Shelly Johnson, Catherine Martell and Pete Martell all seemed doomed in the burning mill. Audrey Horne was in over her head posing as the new prostitute at One Eyed Jacks and about to come face-to-face with the owner, her father. Big Ed came home and found that Nadine had OD’ed on pills while his nephew James was arrested after Bobby Briggs put cocaine on his motorcycle. It was the biggest night in town since the Elk Lodge burned down in the 50s according to Doc.  (more…)

“To be continued…” How quaint. To remember a time when TV shows felt the need to remind us that the story’s not over at the end of an hour is like remembering when you had to set your VCR manually to tape something, or only being able to use the internet when no one was using the telephone. Even from a 1990 perspective, you have to admit adding “To be continued…” to the end of the first season finale of Twin Peaks was grossly unnecessary considering the fate of several main characters was up in the air, while the fate of the main suspects was profoundly more certain. (more…)

In these next episodes of Twin Peaks we start to see the various plot lines coalesce as progress is not just made on the murder mystery of Laura Palmer, but on the backstabbing and double-dealing between the town’s business interests both legitimate and illicit. Circumstances now force us to take this series two episodes at a time if we hope to catch up before the launch of Showtime‘s new season next month, which suits (Burns better) me because the impulse to binge the show is getting stronger as all the elements starting coming together to resolve some of the central mysteries, and take us deeper into others. (more…)

When we last left Twin Peaks (at least so far as the purposes of this series of recap), Agent Cooper had his big breakthrough in the case of who killed Laura Palmer, and it came from a weirdly disjointed, but code-filled, dream sequence. Who was Bob? Who was Mike? Who was the little man? And what did Laura/not-Laura whisper to him? If you thought the answers would be straightforward, then you must be thinking of some other show. But the consequential episode pushed on a key idea of the series so far, that there’s a lot more to Twin Peaks than meets the eye.  (more…)