Features

 

Rick Stafford is a cosplayer with a wide range of charters that he brings to life, but he is most known for his many variations of DC Comics’ heroic defender of the deep, Aquaman. Rick dons the green & gold to attend cons and volunteers to visit sick children in hospitals. He has attended numerous charity events, and conventions to inspire the hero in all of us.

Like any true hero, Rick has had to overcome some extremely difficult obstacles in his life. Some of these obstacles would have broken weaker men, yet Rick continues to preserver, moving forward with the strength and endurance of the indomitable characters he brings to life through his cosplays.

We at NerdBastards had a chance to talk with this real life hero and learn what motivates him to cosplay and volunteer so much of his time to others.
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No Will Smith; no (major) problem.

With Will Smith completely uninterested in returning to the 22-year-old Men in Black franchise (once upon a time, Smith made it look good) and otherwise busy with other commercial pursuits (playing a blue-skinned, top-knotted, magical genie in the recent live-action Aladdin adaptation), Tommy Lee Jones all-but-retired from performing, Sony Pictures unsurprisingly turned to one of the MCU’s MVPs, Chris Hemsworth, and Hemsworth’s Thor: Ragnarok co-star, Tessa Thompson, to restart and/or soft reboot a series that last saw the darkened interior of an air-conditioned movie theater seven years ago (given the rapidity in which pop-culture favorites turn into yesterday’s disposable detritus, zero guarantee moviegoers will respond with more than just passing nostalgia). It was still a gamble. Hemsworth has yet to carry a film outside the MCU. Thompson has yet to topline a major studio film. On individual charisma and collective chemistry alone, Hemsworth and Thompson prove themselves more than worthy of headlining a big-budget, spectacle-driven franchise entry of their own, the F. Gary Gray (The Fate of the Furious, Straight Outta Compton, The Negotiator, Friday) directed Men in Black: International. (more…)

 

Mad Cave Studios is an indie comic book company on the rise. With titles like Honor & Curse, Midnight Task Force, Knights of the Golden Sun, Show’s End, and their flagship title Battlecats, Mad Cave is making a name for itself and taking its place as a respectable indie brand in the comic community. The company repeatedly creates new and diverse titles to captivate its’ readers. No two titles in the Mad Cave line-up are the same, making their books more accessible to a wider audience.

The MADMAN behind this ambitious indie company and the writer for the majority of its titles is Mark London. His MAD dreams and visions have shaped Mad Cave Studios into a forward-thinking company that prides itself on quality storytelling and beautifully expressive art. We had a chance to talk with Mark about Mad Cave Studios, writing comics, the indie scene, and the future for himself, and his company. (more…)

Toynk brings high quality toys and collectibles to your fingertips and they won’t be missing out on E3! Finding them at booth #SH417, Toynk will be debuting new exclusive collectibles from some of the gaming industry’s top games and movie franchises. Trading cards, prototype figures, and all manner of goodies, you don’t wanna miss out on Toynk’s booth during E3 2019. It’s bound to be one for the record books with huge announcements and vendors galore, but few will bring exclusive collectibles and prototypes like Toynk. What can you expect? NerdBastards has you covered.

 

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One thing Nerds love is an independent project. Watching creators build their worlds up from the ground with barely more than their own moxie. It warms the cockles of nerd hearts across the world and can often lead to some of the best work a creator puts out. And today we turn to creator Brian Rosenthal. Notably from his Marvel Zombies vs. Army of Darkness film from 2013, Rosenthal comes at us with his latest pitch for a new movie – The Last Blockbuster.

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Standing six foot, nine inches, Jake Estrada truly is a giant among men. With his catch phrase, “We can do this!”, and his positive encouragement of indie creators, Jake has made a name for himself in his local community and beyond. This gentle giant is a husband, father, indie comic creator, blogger, teacher, producer, artist, actor, and entrepreneur. He is a producer and host for many cons in his local community, including; The Spacie Awards (an award event celebrating indie creators on the Space Coast of Florida), Space Coast Comic Con, and Indiecon (A talent show that will showcase indie creators in Brevard County, FL).

With his publication, Space Coast Comixx, Jake has been able to share his own content as local talent with his local community, elevating those around him as he chases his own dreams.

We had a chance to talk with Jake recently and learned a lot about the indie community, making a movie, and time management. (more…)


Brian Hawkins is an assistant editor at Mad Cave Studious; the writer and creator of Cornrows; and an educator, teaching English to the next generation of comic book collectors and creators. His editorial skills have helped bring books like Knights of the Golden SunMidnight TaskforceBattlecats, & Honor and Curse to life, and his imaginative writing skills are on full display in Cornrows, an explosive story about a vigilante teacher seeking revenge for the death of a former student, merging his two worlds in an urban fantasy comic book.

Brian sat down with us at NerdBastards to answer a few questions and share some advice in the next installment in our series of interviews with indie comic creators. (more…)

When Bryan Singer’s X-Men opened twenty years ago, few expected a mid-budget superhero team-up to spawn two direct sequels, spin-offs, a reboot, and three sequels to the reboot (not to mention re-energizing the superhero genre), but it did, but like all good things – or all things in general – it had to come to an end, but nothing then or now said it had to end with a flaccid, turgid, ultimately pointless entry like the much-delayed, less-than-anticipated Dark Phoenix. A second go-round in bringing Chris Claremont and John Byrne’s classic comic-book storyline to the big screen – Dark Phoenix drops the “mutant cure” storyline that undermined and ultimately neutered Brett Ratner’s -Men: The Last Stand thirteen years ago – replacing it with a woefully underwritten, under-motivated central arc, Jean Grey’s transformation from troubled mutant with telekinetic and psychokinetic powers, to a rage-filled superpowered, near godlike super-mutant, but repeatedly fails to make her – and by extension, Dark Phoenix: the Movie – intrinsically or organically compelling, let alone passably watchable. Another missed opportunity, another misfire isn’t how nostalgia-prone X-fans wanted to see the series end before the Disney Industrial Complex folds the X-Men into the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but that’s what Dark Phoenix delivers. (more…)

Joel Rodriguez is the creator and owner of Metal Ninja Studios, an indie comic book company. He is also the writer of The Dusk County Chronicles, a 24-page horror mini-anthology that asks the questions; “What if Toy Story was a slasher, or Peter Pan required a sacrifice to get into Neverland?” His interesting take on familiar children’s stories and classic horror films makes this anthology a must read.

The Dusk County Chronicles was a Kickstarter project, and after reading it, we at NerdBastards knew we had to interview the twisted writer behind this intriguing book. Joel agreed to answer some of our questions and give us some insight into his future projects.

So, turn down the lights and light a few candles as NerdBastards continues it’s series of interviews with indie comic creators.
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Gareth Edwards’ 2014 Godzilla reboot left moviegoers – and some, if not most, film critics – generally unfulfilled, wanting more, more action, more Godzilla, and more kaiju-on-kaiju action. Godzilla spent the majority of his self-titled movie’s running time offscreen, shown only tangentially as an after-thought. When he finally made it onscreen, it was only briefly. Even the climactic battle between Godzilla and a no-name pair of generic monsters disappointed. Godzilla won the crown and/or title, of course, but humanity lost, not just lives or property, but the claim of ownership or dominion over the earth and its resources (cue environmental/climate change theme). In the 2014 reboot, San Francisco took the brunt of Godzilla’s final battle. By the end, thousands, if not hundreds of thousands had lost their lives, but in the Godzilla-verse, the human cost of kaiju battles usually gets sidestepped or simply ignored. The spectacle is all, the human drama, if any, always a distant second. That, of course, isn’t so much a criticism as it is an observation that also holds true for the direct sequel, Godzilla: King of the Monsters, an unapologetically dazzling 200-million-dollar love letter to the Godzilla-verse that’s spanned more than sixty years (and counting). (more…)