analysis

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This is it, my friends.  This is the episode that will take the Peter Capaldi naysayers and do one of two things: shut them up, or prove that they are clinically insane if they continue to grouse about how not-great he is.  “The Zygon Inversion” is the best episode of the season so far, and should reaffirm for viewers what Doctor Who is all about: challenging perceptions, championing kindness and tolerance, and breaking the mold of what a “silly little science fiction show” is supposed to be.

 

WARNING: What you’re about to read contains spoilers about this episode and possibly other episodes/seasons of Doctor Who.  Proceed at your own risk/reward!

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Another multi-part story arc comes at us in full swing this week, and this one breaks out some big guns.  “The Zygon Invasion” hearkens us back to Doctor Who’s past, both semi-distant and relatively-recent, to bring us a story that feels fairly sweeping in its nature.  The series, as always, does a pretty damned good job of referencing its rich history while working within the confines of already-established canon.

 

WARNING: What you’re about to read contains spoilers about this episode and possibly other episodes/seasons of Doctor Who.  Proceed at your own risk/reward!

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Wrapping up the story established in last week’s episode – although this is a fairly loosely-connected two-parter, with the only real connection being Maisie Williams’ character – “The Woman Who Lived” is an interesting exercise in dichotomy.  For all the amazing character work we get from Williams and Peter Capaldi (Jenna-Louise Coleman is conspicuously absent from this story, more on that below), the writing and pacing of the episode severely lets them – and by extent, the audience – down.

 

WARNING: What you’re about to read contains spoilers about this episode and possibly other episodes/seasons of Doctor Who.  Proceed at your own risk/reward!

(more…)