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So the fact that Captain America: The Winter Soldier takes place in the modern all but mitigates the possibility of any actors besides Chris Evans (Steve Rogers/Captain America) and Sebastian Stan (Bucky/Winter Soldier) from returning. But not so says Stanley Tucci, who played super soldier serum creator Dr. Erskine in The First Avenger. He’s not referring to himself, of course, but another character from the film that Cap was very, very fond of.

While being interviewed by Collider about his role in the upcoming Bryan Singer film Jack the Giant Slayer, Tucci let slip that while he hasn’t been yet asked to cameo in the new Captain America film, his co-star Hayley Atwell, who played love interest Peggy Carter in the film, has.

“I’m really sad,” he said about not getting the nod before adding, “I know that Hayley is going back to do a flashback scene, but I have not been asked.”

Tucci counts himself as a fan of the romance between Cap and Peggy in the first film. “I really love that.  I really love the relationship between the two of them,” Tucci added, but how did he find out about Atwell’s re-appearance in the Marvel Universe? “I just had dinner with [her] last night, we’ve become good friends.”

As previously reported, Revenge actress Emily VanCamp will play the leading lady in The Winter Soldier, and rumor has it the character is none other than Sharon Carter, granddaughter of Peggy. So will Cap flashback upon meeting the new Agent Carter? Or maybe Atwell’s going to put on old age make-up, as revealed in the deleted scenes of The Avengers, we know that Peggy’s still alive in 2012.

But on a final note for this story, Tucci has nothing but love for the first Captain America film. “I loved making that movie,” he explained. “I had a great time. I really like Joe Johnston. I think he’s a wonderful director. I also love the look of the film, and the tone of the film, and the character was great. I was thrilled to be able to play that. I was so sad that I died because I wanted to come back and do another one. It was great to be offered this old, German scientist. I thought, ‘Oh, that’s great.’ I couldn’t tell if I was really flattered or insulted.  I don’t know.”

Captain America: The Winter Soldier will be in theaters April 4, 2014.

Prometheus was one of this summer’s biggest disappointments for a lot of fans, and a lot of that blame, for better or worse, fell on screenwriter Damon Lindelof. But as development on the sequel gets underway, it seems that it will have to be done without Lindelof. Here’s what the writer had to say in brief…

“The thing about Prometheus was it was a rewrite.  Jon Spaihts wrote a script and I rewrote it.  And still it was a year of my life that I spent on Prometheus, kind of all in.  The idea of building a sequel to it—from the ground up this time—with Ridley is tremendously exciting.  But at the same time, I was like, “Well that’s probably going to be two years of my life.”  I can’t do what J.J. [Abrams] does.   I don’t have the capability.  I’m usually very single-minded creatively.  I can only be working on one thing at a time.  So I said to him, “I really don’t think I could start working on this movie until I do this other stuff.  And I don’t know when the other stuff is going to be done.”  And he was like, “Well, okay, it’s not like I asked you anyways.”  He and I are on excellent terms and it was a dream come true to work with him.  But much to the delight of all the fanboys, I don’t see myself being involved in Prometheus-er.”

So I guess you won’t have Damon Lindelof to push around anymore… Not that I think that the faults of Prometheus are entirely his alone, but Lindelof is such a lightening rod for the fan community maybe it might help the sequel engender some trust if he’s not in the picture.

Here’s the full exchange from the Collider interview:

Collider: I know from people at Fox that they were really happy with the worldwide box office of Prometheus and that they are moving forward on a sequel.  Are you involved at all?

Damon Lindelof:  I am not.  Ridley [Scott] and I talked at great length during the story process of the first movie about what subsequent movies would be if Prometheus were to be successful.  And I think that the movie ended in a very specific way that hinted at, or strongly implied that there were going to be continuing adventures worthy of writing stories.  What those stories would be would not necessarily usurp or transcend the Alien franchise as we saw it because we know that the Nostromo hasn’t come along yet.  So the idea was to set up a universe that… Is it a prequel?  Okay.  If that’s what we want to call it, sure.  But the sequel to this movie is not Alien.  The sequel to this movie is this other thing.

So Ridley and I talked about what that other thing might be, and he was excited about doing it.  But then I think what ended up happening was that the movie came out, and there was a reaction to the movie.  And I got really wrapped up in Trek, and really wrapped up in this movie that I’m producing and writing with Brad Bird.  And I have a TV project that I was really passionate about.  Ridley and I had a meeting after Prometheus came out where we started talking again about where this journey would go.  And in that meeting I said to him, unfortunately, before he could ask me and go through the discomfort of whether he was going to ask me or not… It’s sort of like having a date where you’re letting the other person know, “I’m in another relationship.”  So I can’t tell you that he asked me and I said no.  But I did communicate to him that I was working on these other things.

The thing about Prometheus was it was a rewrite.  Jon Spaihts wrote a script and I rewrote it.  And still it was a year of my life that I spent on Prometheus, kind of all in.  The idea of building a sequel to it—from the ground up this time—with Ridley is tremendously exciting.  But at the same time, I was like, “Well that’s probably going to be two years of my life.”  I can’t do what J.J. [Abrams] does.   I don’t have the capability.  I’m usually very single-minded creatively.  I can only be working on one thing at a time.  So I said to him, “I really don’t think I could start working on this movie until I do this other stuff.  And I don’t know when the other stuff is going to be done.”  And he was like, “Well, okay, it’s not like I asked you anyways.”  He and I are on excellent terms and it was a dream come true to work with him.  But much to the delight of all the fanboys, I don’t see myself being involved in Prometheus-er.

At least he’s self-aware about it. But despite the hate, Lindelof is staying busy, writing and producing Star Trek Into Darkness and Brad Bird’s super-secret 1952. He also did re-writes on Marc Forster’s World War Z.

Source: Collider

This should come as no surprise given Bill Murray‘s latest rebuff of Ghostbusters 3, but according to Ivan Reitman, the next phase of the Ghostbusters franchise will be… A booting. I mean, a reboot.

I think Ghostbusters probably should be remade, if we can get it all right. We’re working on it, so we’ll see.

Say what?! This, perhaps, slip of the tongue came out during a discussion with Collider  about Dave, the Gary Ross-scripted 1993 movie starring Kevin Kline about a presidential impersonator who has to take the place of the real president when he has a stroke; it comes out on Blu-ray tomorrow.

So the question is if this is a real thing or if maybe Reitman was just spitballing, discussing the possible future of the film series according to his own idea and is not genuinely moving forward with a third movie with the original cast. Frankly, with the Murray “will he or won’t he” yo-yo game it would be unsurprising if there hasn’t already been a serious conversation about a reboot. After all, I think Ghostbusters is the only movie from the 80s left besides E.T. and Back to the Future to not get remade.

Let slip with your thoughts and anger below.

Source: Bleeding Cool

Paramount Pictures is getting in gear for another sci-fi flick called Collider.  We’ve no idea what it’s about but a number of the big wigs of the sci-fi movie genre will be contributing to this film, which would make keeping an eye on it worth our while.  Some notables are J. J. Abrams (Star Trek), who will be producing though Bad Robot and Mark Protosevich (I Am Legend),who will be writing the screenplay.  Edgar Wright will be directing Collider and co-writing the screenplay alongside Protosevich.

Any speculation about the nature of this film?  Do the names involved make this more of a potential interest for you guys?

Source: /Film, Deadline

Made under one of those secrecy cloaks, we’ve had no idea what Neill Blomkamp‘s District 9 follow-up Elysium has been about… Until now.

Well, I guess the film hasn’t been developed in a cave. For instance, we know that it’s sci-fi, and we know that it stars Jodie Foster and the shaven-head of Matt Damon, but plot details? Forget about it!

But Collider got some scoop this morning, and it came from, of all things, a party invitation. There’s a special preview screening of Elysium happening somewhere tonight, and the invite includes the first, let’s say, official plot description. First the plot synopsis, and then the ticket image:

In the year 2159 two classes of people exist: the very wealthy who live on a pristine man-made space station called Elysium, and the rest, who live on an overpopulated, ruined Earth. Secretary Rhodes (Jodie Foster), a hard line government official, will stop at nothing to enforce anti-immigration laws and preserve the luxurious lifestyle of the citizens of Elysium. That doesn’t stop the people of Earth from trying to get in, by any means they can. When unlucky Max (Matt Damon) is backed into a corner, he agrees to take on a daunting mission that if successful will not only save his life, but could bring equality to these polarized worlds.

No word on who all’s invited to the screening, but maybe we’ll be getting some advanced reviews/insight into the film sometime in the immediate future. Stay tuned.

Elysium, starring Damon and Foster along with Sharlto Copley, Wagner Moura, William Fichtner, Sonia Braga, and Diego Luna will hit theaters on March 1, 2013.

Source: /Film

Is there Khan? Are their Klingons? What is the deal with J.J. Abrams’ untitled Star Trek sequel anyway? Well, screenwriters Damon Lindelof and Roberto Orci aimed to offer some insight (if you can call it that) in a recent round of press.

Let’s start with Lindelof, who spoke to Collider while out helping to promote this Friday’s release of Prometheus. First off, Lindelof talked about building a bigger, better Enterprise set for the sequel:

There’s certainly an instinct to just go bigger in the second movie and one of the things that we did was we connected all the sets, so you can just basically follow the actors off the bridge, into a turbo lift, down, walking through a plaza, into the med bay as opposed to [having to] cut every time you do that, because when we were shooting on the Paramount stages we just didn’t have the money to connect all the sets.

Speaking of money, Lindelof talked about the awesomeness of  Benedict Cumberbatch and watching him bring to life the film’s villain, Maybe-Khan:

Benedict Cumberbatch, I can already say with a certain degree of confidence that he is gonna give an iconic film performance and one of the best sci-fi performances that I’ve ever seen. And not even having seen the movie yet, just sitting there in video village with the headphones on. So I’m really psyched.

And in addition, for the record, Lindelof called Cumberbatch’s fellow Trek newcomer Alice Eve, “awesome.”

Moving on to another interview, Lindelof also talked to TrekMovie.com, and was asked about the rather intense secrecy around the film, and it’s his assertion that real fans don’t want to know every last detail about the film before it’s released:

We want to leave some air of mystery and intrigue surrounding the movie. Because as much as people clamor for information, I really fundamentally believe they don’t want to know. It is modulating that desire between “I know that my Christmas presents are in my parents closet and if I open it up I can see what I will get.” But, on Christmas morning when you see those same gifts under the tree, you know what’s inside and there is a part of you that wishes you hadn’t peeked. So it is up to us to lock the closet tight.

Word. But seriously, when are we going to get a real look at the film, Lindelof?

I’m not going to confirm or deny that [the trailer will be at Comic-Con]. Our feeling is, that if we can get something together that is worthy of showing on that timetable, then we will most certainly show it. But, if it is sub-par or not ready or requires more post-production, then nobody at Comic Con is going to want to hear us say “hey this is very temporary, but we wanted to show you something.” We need to put our best foot forward. We just wrapped principal photography as you know and Comic Con is in mid July so it is an aggressive timetable. If we are going to go we are going to go big or not go at all.

Aggressive timetable’s aside, I think Captain America was in production for two and half days before it appeared at Comic Con 2010.

Also at TrekMovie.com, Star Trek 2 co-writer Roberto Orci  dropped by the site to answer some fan questions. Interestingly, Orci revealed that he had prior to the interview had a glass of wine while on a flight, but apparently the alcohol didn’t loosen up his lips too much because he reveal too much that’s incendiary. Here’s some highlights from Orci’s chat:

  • (Maybe) confirmed that Klingons are in the sequel (then sort of backtracked)
  • Did confirm Klingons (if they appear) will have ridged foreheads (like in 2009 deleted scenes)
  • Title for sequel still being debated
  • Hopes that first teaser will be “very soon”
  • No word yet on what’s going on for San Diego Comic Con (but will know soon)
  • Sequel was “harder” to write than the first Trek due to lower expectations for the first one
  • Animated show still a possibility
  • “More than a few” hints have already been dropped into ongoing comics
  • Harry Mudd is NOT the villain in the Star Trek movie –
  • No comment if Nimoy will appear
  • Watched all of original Star Trek series and TOS movies to prep for sequel, took away ” a better sense of tone and where our heroes are supposed to be like once they mature out of 09″

I think it’s safe to say that we’ll see something from the film by the end of summer. Usually as we go into fall we start getting glimpses at next summer’s offerings and I’m Star Trek will be no exception. Obviously, we’ll keep you posted.

Source: /Film