Eric Stoltz

BTTF Stoltz

It’s one of the questions that people love to ask and love to think about the answer to: what if?  Many movies, novels, and TV shows have been created around that simple premise, and things get even more detailed when the question is extended to what if something that actually happened might have happened a different way?  As we approach “Back to the Future Day” – October 21, 2015, the destination date that Doc Brown set the DeLorean to travel into the future (but not the film’s release anniversary date, that’s July 3, FYI) – the love-fest for the film trilogy is reaching an all-time high, and deservedly so.  It also has cast and crew talking about the experience like they never have before; long silent on the topic, director and co-writer Robert Zemeckis has finally decided to share more insight on one of the most famous what if scenarios surrounding Back to the Future: what if Michael J. Fox hadn’t played the role of Marty McFly?

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In 1985 Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale created the first in what would become known as the Back to the Future film trilogy, but not everybody knows what happened during shooting. A month in, star Eric Stoltz, the original Marty McFly, was replaced with young upstart Michael J. Fox and production went on, later making Fox a household name. That decision never sat well with Gale and became the idea behind Back to Back to the Future, the latest comic book from writer and creator David Guy Levy.

Last week we caught up with David for a quick Q&A to discuss everything Back to Back to the Future. Here he talks about the project’s humble beginnings, what it has become now and what lesson David would like people to get out of reading his creation. Along the way we also talk about the art of Back to Back to the Future artist Jeffery Spokes and the special connection David has to the Young Storytellers Foundation.

Check out the interview after the jump.
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Gingers! So what’s the big deal? Why are so many of us apparently fascinated by folks with red hair, light skin, and occasionally freckles? Especially when such individuals become media personalities? “Red” is the rarest natural hair color on the planet: Only 1-2% of the world’s population have it. Red hair has been associated with personality traits such as fiery temperament, combativeness or aggressiveness, and an overactive–if not downright freaky libido. Religious and mythological figures from King David to Judas Iscariot to the Egyptian God Set have all been thought to be, or depicted as being Gingers. Oh, and with apologies to Marvel Comics and Chris Hemsworth: According to Norse mythology, Thor was a redhead–not a blonde.

As for why redheads are called Gingers in the first place, there seems to be no real consensus: It’s primarily a British term, and still considered mildly derogatory to many in the UK. One popular theory is that it has nothing to do with color, but instead refers to the hot-blooded demeanor redheads supposedly possess. Most likely, it started in the middle ages, when “Gynger” referred to the coloration of a red rooster. Regardless of the hows and whys, redheads stick out, and more than a few have made indelible marks on popular culture. Here then is ten of the most well-known and influential Gingers, who have risen to iconic status….despite the unfortunate handicap of having no souls.

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