legal

jaynehatt

It was like someone tried to unite all the planets under a central alliance yesterday when news hit the web that Ripple Junction, the official licensed makers of the “Jayne hat” from Firefly, had sent cease and desist letters to small-time producers who’ve been cranking out the homemade head gear and selling them online and at conventions for years.

Comparatively, Ripple Junction has only been selling the hats since last year, a full 10 years after the series ended, so the people that launched the Jayne hat cottage industry were understandably pissed. Their rights were being trampled on, and they need some big damn heroes to stand up and rebel. Some Browncoats, if you will.

Fortunately for fans, many former members of the cast and crew of Firefly are very active on Twitter, and naturally in appealing for help they went to the top and started with the Captain, the artist formally known as Malcolm Reynolds, Nathan Fillion. And although his response was rather cryptic, Fillion’s intention was fairly clear when he Tweeted:

Take as Fillion’s permission to aim to misbehave. (Keep in mind, he’s the star of one of the top-rated programs on a major American broadcast network so he can’t fight the power like he once did.)

In terms of more tacit approval of protest action, we go to Firefly costume designer Shawna Trpcic. She designed the original Jayne hat and offered the following:

Well isn’t that adorable. Even a blood-sucking lawyer would have a hard time serving a C&D on those Jayne-hat wearing fans.

But what about the Hero of Canton himself, AKA: Adam Baldwin? What words of support does he have to offer fans?

adambaldwintweet

So there is solidarity on the internet. Clearly, the people trying to step on the little guy making Jayne hats under-estimated the fan commitment to their favorite head gear. Of course, if they hadn’t it wouldn’t have taken someone a decade to realize there was a market for such a chapeau, but I digress.

More news as it develops.

Source: Blastr

For 10 fuckin’ years, Neil Gaiman and Todd McFarlane have been trapped in a legal bitchfest… Primarily because McFarlane and his people are selfish sons of bitches.  But this shit has finally been settled and Gaiman will be see the dues he’s waited a fuckin’ decade to receive.

Basically, the schtick is that Gaiman (who is best known for his work with Sandman) wrote issue #9 of McFarlane’s Spawn in 1993 in which he introduced a bunch of characters that became srs bsns in the comic series, movie and TV series and was never properly credited for his involvement (i.e. never received the royalties he was due).  So Gaiman has been trying to sue McFarlane for the past ten years.  Holy shit.

It shouldn’t have been this goddamn difficult to get the recognition he deserved from a company that was founded by artists who wanted to have creative license and ownership over their creations.  Funny enough, McFarlane was one of the founders of Image Comics.

Hit the jump to see what Gaiman was finally able to post on Twitter today.

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A while back CBS, those guys that keep making spin-off’s of CSI, announced a pilot re-imagining Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes called Elementary. Wait a tick, doesn’t the BBC already have a show based on Britan’s infamous crime solving duo of Sherlock and Watson? Yes, and the BBC is more then a little upset about it.

Sitting down with the UK’s The Independent, Sherlock executive producer, Sue Vertue recently spoke about being approached by CBS with hopes of licensing a U.S. version of the BBC series. Vertue was less then enthusiastic about the offer, turning it down in the process. Guess CBS didn’t enjoy getting told “no” by the company that makes Doctor Who because shortly after that CBS announced Elementary, a modern day retelling of Holmes and Watson in New York City.

We understand that CBS are doing their own version of an updated Sherlock Holmes,” she said. “It’s interesting, as they approached us a while back about remaking our show. At the time, they made great assurances about their integrity, so we have to assume that their modernised Sherlock Holmes doesn’t resemble ours in any way, as that would be extremely worrying.

Even Doctor Who and Sherlock showrunner, Steven Moffat spoke up about CBS’s supposed idea, taking to Twitter to voice his opinion:

“We are very proud of our show, and like any proud parent will protect the interest and well being of our offspring,” Sue went on to say and all the power to her and the BBC for it. Who wouldn’t want to protect something they’ve put their name to and stuck their neck out for? If this keeps up and CBS moves forward in their attempt to create their own Holmes, legal action is definitively around the corner.

Additional details about Elementary have yet to be released, smart move CBS.

Source: You Bent My Wookie