new nightmare

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Heather Langenkamp just celebrated her 50th birthday. Think about that for a minute: the final girl from that first Nightmare on Elm Street movie has been around for over five decades now. (Not to insult Ms. Langenkamp, of course, because she looks great.) Of course, three of those decades have been all about the legend of Freddy Krueger and talking about her big break in Wes Craven‘s seminal horror film. And not only has Langenkamp appeared in three of the eight Nightmare movies, she produced the quintessential documentary about the franchise, Never Sleep Again. This past weekend at the National Fan Expo, Langenkamp re-untied with co-stars Robert Englund and John Saxon to celebrate Freddy’s 30th birthday, and Nerd Bastards got a few minutes to pick her brain. You know, in a good way. (more…)

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Throughout the 70s and 80s, there were a lot of movie monsters, but only one of them really had a consistent face. Robert Englund was the face of Freddy Krueger through eight Nightmare on Elm Street films, a couple of music videos and a TV series called Freddy’s Nightmares, and this year Freddy Krueger turns 30 years old. Freddy’s portrayer, Englund, has worked consistently since his twin breakthroughs in 1984, Nightmare and the TV series V, building up an impressive resume of over 100 different film and TV projects. But with three decades now come and gone, more than ever, Englund is most closely associated with the burnt, disfigured “bastard son of a hundred maniacs.”

In an recent interview with Nerd Bastards, looking forward to Englund’s pending appearance at the National Fan Expo in Downtown Toronto, the actor discussed his enduring appeal as a horror icon, his recent flirtation with putting Freddy’s face on again, and his actually quite impressive knowledge of the geography of Canada’s largest city. (more…)

I went on IMDb to start writing this review, and I clicked on The Cabin in the Woods so I could call up the details, like the correct spelling of actors’ names and so forth. As I scrolled to the bottom of the page to where the message boards lie, I noticed one labelled “Evil Dead rip-off anyone?” Two things occurred: one, this poster clearly hadn’t see the movie as he obviously missed the point, and two, does Sam Raimi own the patent on young people going to a cabin in the woods and having bad things happen to them?

If Drew Goddard’s feature directorial debut reminds you of a horror movie you’ve previously seen, than good… It’s supposed to. This is no remake, no gross out torture porn, and especially no found footage trending piece. Think of Scream, or better still think of Wes Craven’s under-appreciated deconstruction of the franchise he created, New Nightmare. In Nightmare, Craven played on the original Nightmare on Elm Street, exploring the notion of Freddy Krueger as the embodiment of nightmares and human fascination with the horrific. The Cabin in the Woods is like that, but not really.

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